Beloved Ones of God,

In 1930, Samuel Lewis made his first journey to New York City. He had been attracted there by the artistic work of Nicholas Roerich and his worldwide ideals. At that time Roerich's group had built a large skyscraper with housing for artists and poets and the like to go along with Roerich's amazing drawings in which Sam saw what he called a dharma transmission, the embodiment in art of spiritual realization.

As a young poet and writer, Sam applied and got an invitation to join this artistic community. Every day he would contemplate the vast array of pictures. He particularly loved Mother of the World, and years later would give it to his women's dance class as a meditation practice. Sam wrote a medley of poems each with a number from the exhibition in the Roerich Museum. Here is his poem inspired by Mother of the World.

MOTHER OF THE WORLD
O Thou veiled One,
Whose words unuttered fall like dazzling jewels
In the throne-room in the Center of the Infinite;
We kneel before Thy bounteous Presence...
Thou sacrificing, All-pervading Mother…
To Thee we offer praise for every favor,
Humbling ourselves before Thy Heavenly Throne,
Hailing Thy Glory through endless kotis of aeons.
Without Thee less than naught are we,
But through Thy magnanimity,
We have been raised to quaff the purest nectar.
Praise to Thee forever, Mother of gods and devas and men,
We worship and adore Thee, Soul of our souls.
-- From the poems of Samuel Lewis, in the set called Rhapsodiae Coronae

As a worker for world peace through the inner teachings of all religions, Sam became involved in the Roerich group's work for the Banner of Peace project. He warned them in a minority report that if they got "important people" involved - politicans and social leaders and the like - it would blow up in their face, and it did. However, he learned a great deal from Roerich's efforts and saw that it was not a movement that would bring peace through the arts but individuals who would stand forth in the light of realization. In the course of his life he would make peace through the arts part of his world program, and over time expanded it into to music, poetry, and dance.

Thank you all for your prayers and support for the biography project we are working on. And thanks to Donna Walia DeMille who did an excellent job helping us with researching Roerich's influence in Samuel Lewis' life, more of which you will see when the book is completed.

Love and Blessings,

Wali Ali